Organizing

Randy Soltero
Organizer
RSoltero@iatselocal720.com
702-873-3450
John Gorey
Organizer
JGorey@iatselocal720.com
702-873-3450

A labor union is an organization that acts as an intermediary between its members and the businesses that employ them. The main purpose of labor unions is to give workers the power to negotiate for more favorable working conditions and other benefits through collective bargaining.

Your Representative

One other key benefit of working as a union employee is that union representatives work on your behalf if you have a personal issue with the employer. Non-union employees have to contact the company’s human resources department for assistance, but it’s important to keep in mind that the department is part of the company. Meeting with a boss and the employer’s HR representative can make an employee with a gripe feel outnumbered or vulnerable. A union representative will come into a meeting between you and the employer to help resolve the issue. 

Weingarten Rights

Rule 1: The employee must make a clear request for union representation before or during the interview. The employee cannot be punished for making this request.

Rule 2: After the employee makes the request, the employer must choose from among three options:

  • grant the request and delay questioning until the union representative arrives and (prior to the interview continuing) the representative has a chance to consult privately with the employee;
  • deny the request and end the interview immediately; or
  • give the employee a clear choice between having the interview without representation, or ending the interview.

Rule 3: If the employer denies the request for union representation, and continues to ask questions, it commits an unfair labor practice and the employee has a right to refuse to answer. The employer may not discipline the employee for such a refusal.

Collective Barganing

Collective bargaining is the heart and soul of the labor union. Collective bargaining occurs when a group of people, such as the workforce at a company, bands together to increase its negotiating power. For instance, a single worker might feel that a certain new safety measure should be implemented in his factory, but he might have limited power to get the company to install the new measure. If the entire workforce is made aware of the need for the new measure and bands together to pressure the company to install it, there is a much greater chance that the company will comply. Labor unions band workers together, allowing the voices of individual workers to be heard and possibly made into a goal of the union. Unionized workers typically elect representatives to bring concerns to the company’s attention.

Union or Bust

If you work in a show or venue where you and your coworkers have discussed the work conditions, pay rate, benefits, or other treatment by the employer and would like to discuss organizing, we are here to help you. 

Local 720 has a full-time organizing department. We are very discreet, and can arrange to meet the members of the crew that are interested in organizing at a neutral location. We will not contact your employer until the crew has made the decision to proceed. If you would like more information about the process, call or e-mail, Local 720's Chief Organizer, Randy Soltero, at the phone number or e-mail address above.

What Can 720 Offer?

Being a member of Local 720 provides you with rights you may not already be aware of, and makes you aware of others the employer never wanted you to know. Nevada is a "right to work" state, which means you can be a referent working out of the union without being a member. Working out of the union as a referent affords you the same rights of protection as a member. Becoming a member of the union gives you the right to participate in contract negotiations, union decisions, and at the same time make the union as a whole stronger.

Better Benefits

On average, union workers are more likely to enjoy better benefits compared to non-union employees. That includes health, retirement accounts, and paid sick leave. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 77 percent of union workers get pensions, (guaranteed continued payments), after they retire from the job, compared to only 20 percent of non-union workers. Again, union representatives work out these details as a part of the collective bargaining agreement with the employer.

Higher Wagws

One of the top benefits of being a union worker is that you enjoy a better wage as compared to your non-union counterparts. Union workers get about 20 percent more in terms of wages (not including benefits) compared to others in similar jobs that aren’t supported by a union. Union workers are also more likely to enjoy consistent pay raises on a regular basis. This is due to collective bargaining between the union (on behalf of the employees) and the employer that results in an agreement setting out clear terms regarding pay and wages. With a non-union job, the employer can set the wage without any formal bargaining process or input from the employee.